Category Archives: dishes

let’s talk washing up shall we

any note that starts with “let’s” i kind of immediately love. this one was forwarded by lindsay in watford, england:

which one of these is not like the other?

along with the mad bomber series, i’d say this note is one for the hall of fame. there are so many amazing elements here i can’t even pick a favorite.

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the post-it wars

after receiving numerous “helpful tips” from her roommate at the university of minnesota…

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lydia decided to add a few post-its of her own.

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(the large signs on the oven and the microwave were already there.)

care: it makes a difference

this girl is like the archetypal freshman roommate, no?

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from megan in charleston, who was not the slob that this note might suggest.

how hazing rituals are born

happy hunting

jimmy in worcester brings this jaunty little note to us from the lambda chi alpha house at WPI.

says jimmy: “the kid whose cookware was hidden ended up just leaving the utensils (tongs, spatula, etc…) wherever they were hidden and simply bought a new set. this forced the kid who originally hid them to find them again before they started to stink up the place.”

just in case you needed another reason to pass on the lambda chis’ rush-week pancake breakfast.

with 17 roommates, it could have been worse

green stuff

this lovely petri dish courtesy of ben, who explains: “while living in a house in london with 17 people from all over the world, things become way too green. this had to be done every once in a while in order to remind others not to overpopulate our kitchen with new living organisms.”

this is getting so meta

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Frank writes, “Nice blogs….But I would like to point out that your passive-aggressive notes site
is a complete rip-off of a humor piece I wrote over three years ago for the now-defunct humor magazine Jest.”

Well played, Frank! Not only is the piece in question quite humorous indeed, but Frank’s use of classic passive-aggressive conventions (the faint praise, the “helpful” suggestion) in his e-mail about said piece is exemplary.

Read the whole thing here.